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Michael Eager of La Nueva Posada Hotel & Restaurant – Best Places In The World To Retire User Account
Holiday Inn at San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico – Best Places In The World To Retire – International LivingThe lifestyle in Mexico is fantastic. I travel and go to other parts of the world and I compare lifestyles. What we have here in Mexico is so special in the sense that in this part of Mexico we have beautiful, eternal spring-like weather. The cost of living is relatively reasonable. 
 
The greatest asset of Mexico is the local people because they are so friendly. I feel so at home here in Mexico. Those who do come down to Mexico and discover how the local people are find the magic of this area. 
 
Mexican people do not change even if you go to the state of Michoacán and Guanajuato. Respect for the elderly is embedded in the Mexicans since they were young. 
 
People come to Mexico and experiment by renting for a while. After that, they may never want to go back to where they came from. For anybody in the 60 years and up age group, anywhere you go in Mexico is an ideal place to come to.
 
 
There may be some areas in Chiapas, Guerrero, and some of the Border States where there have been security risks and problems like that. You need to practice common sense.
 
Chiapas is a place that has a pretty bad reputation with security issues. I know two Catholic priests and one of them was a native monk in Chiapas who became a Catholic priest. The monk from Chiapas was telling me the root of a lot of the problems. Chiapas may have problems, but it's still a beautiful place to go and visit. Anybody I talk to who has gone to San Cristóbal de las Casas or San Juan Chamula in Chiapas says that he had a great time.  
 
(Holiday Inn at San Cristóbal de las Casas, Mexico, pictured. )
Yolanda Martinez – Best Places In The World To Retire User Account
Santa Fe City, Mexico City, Mexico – Best Places In The World To Retire – International LivingI believe what it’s like to live in Mexico depends on what lifestyle each individual prefers. If you want the really high-end, you can have a high-end lifestyle in Mexico. There are gourmet areas to go out. There are designer shopping type malls. There is a very, very elite way of living, very expensive, but we have it. We have shopping malls called Andares in Guadalajara but we have those types of shopping malls all over Mexico. 
 
In Playa del Carmen, you have 5th Avenue. In Mexico City, we have what’s called Perisur, which is the ring that you go in a circle in our driving system in the south. It’s what we call the south mall. You have Santa Fe City in Mexico City. In Guanajuato, you have, you have many shopping malls if you want the high-end and you can also live very frugally in Mexico if you’re on a budget. It depends which lifestyle you want to live.
 
If you want to go have the finest dining every night you can find it in Mexico. If you like cook organically and very vegan healthy, we have organic markets. If you like to be on a budget and eat what you get on your Social Security paycheck, if it’s less than $1,000 for two, you can go to a normal market also. You have all different types of lifestyles in Mexico.
 
(Santa Fe City, Mexico City, Mexico, pictured.)
Yvon Marier of Travel  Info Mexico – Best Places In The World To Retire User Account
Yvon Marier enjoying the beach with his dog and a friend, Mexico.jpg – Best Places In The World To Retire – International LivingMexico is home to different kinds of lifestyles. If you want to be a beach bum and just sit on the beach, have fun and enjoy the ocean, you can do that. Mexico has miles and miles of beach you can enjoy. If you want to be involved in animal rescue, orphanages and whatever you desire, you can definitely get involved in those activities. 
 
Here in Mexico, what matters is what you really want to do. If you want to sit down and read a book, that’s fine. I love doing activities with animals, so that’s what occupies my time. Some people like to be with children or going to the church and that’s what they do. 
 
In Canada, to a certain extent you can do anything you like, too, but it’s not as easy as it is in Mexico. In Canada, everyone has their own home and people usually stay at home unless they go to special occasions and meet other people. Here in Mazatlán, we expats and snowbirds all know each other so everybody ends up talking to each other. We’re a community more so than in Canada because everybody knows each other, and people do a lot of things in groups. 
 
I was in the military for 21 years. I had a very bad parachute accident that injured my spine. I broke my neck during the accident, and I was in a very bad shape for many years. I soon suffered from arthritis that affected my entire body- from my nose down to my toes. 
 
I started coming to Mexico because of my health. I was so sick in Canada and had to take morphine and lots of painkillers. When my family and I started coming to Mexico roughly fifteen years ago, I started feeling so much better. I spoke to my doctor who said I should come back to Mexico, and that’s why I kept coming back. I would come to Mexico once, twice or thrice a month, and eventually because of coming to Mexico I was able to get off all of my painkillers, and I was able to relax. I can enjoy life so much better now. 
 
Life is so much better in Mexico because the temperature is much more stable compared to Canada. In Canada, you can have four seasons in a single day. That’s one of the things that makes a big difference for me. 
 
(Yvon Marier enjoying the beach with his dog and a friend, Mexico, pictured.)
Marvin Golden of Lake Chapala Real Estate – Best Places In The World To Retire User Account
House with master wing and guest wing, Ajijic, Mexico – Best Places In The World To Retire – International LivingI absolutely love the lifestyle here in Mexico because I don’t have to wake up at 5 AM to go out and shovel snow, then come in, get dressed for work, and drive to work in the dark, like I would if I were in Canada. If I had a store in Canada, I would have to shovel snow at the store, too. Or if I had a big parking lot, I would have to hire somebody and then come home in the dark and sometimes shovel snow again. 
 
In contrast, here in Mexico, I get up in the morning when the sun gets up. The sun wakes me up. I look at the beautiful lake view, and I have a nice home and I love it. I go out to have breakfast, which I can get for US $3 or $4 if I want it. And it is fast. I can also spend $20 and have a steak and a bottle of wine but I don’t need to do that.
 
I couldn’t afford a gardener or a maid back in Canada. They make as much as I do so I might as well just do it myself. So in Canada, when you get home, you have all of these chores to do. Here in Mexico, I have gardeners that come three times a week. Sometimes one for half and hour and sometimes three for three hours to do whatever they need to do. I pay them a flat rate, which is $40 a week. Our maid comes twice a week. She would happily cook so we could have someone cook for us. We probably eat out almost as much as we eat at home because the restaurants are close and it is economical. It also doesn’t cost us a fortune to park.
 
There are lots of wonderful people here from all over the world, especially from the United States and Canada. We have all kinds of different experiences, so we are not sitting around complaining about our jobs and about how life is and about how everything is terrible. Instead, we are sharing experiences with others about and how they came to live here after coming back from someplace else or a group of them is going somewhere else and have a different activity. So I feel like I’m really spoiled.
 
(House with master wing and guest wing, Ajijic, Mexico, pictured.)
Sandi Vandiver – Best Places In The World To Retire User Account
Cliff diving in Mazatlan, Mexico – Best Places In The World To Retire – International LivingFor me, living in Mexico is a challenge because I don’t speak good Spanish. If you spoke really good Spanish, you’d get by a lot easier. I’m not good with languages and I’ve never buckled down, which is my mistake.
 
Things are different. It’s a much slower pace. In Mexico, and in particular, the beach communities feel like you have stepped back in time a little bit. Everybody’s got a cell phone, no doubt, and almost every who can, has a computer, but they still have a backward way of looking at it. My theory, and only my theory, is that Mexico has historically been a country of “haves and have not.” You were one of the rich people or you were one of the laborers. As a laborer, your patron took care of you from cradle to grave. You had no real incentive to work hard, get ahead, to get to be the boss, because that was never going to happen.  Now, you find the younger people using the Internet and they see what’s going on in the rest of the world. Now, they want those jeans and those tennis shoes.
 
Mexico is not really a Third World country but I would certainly say it’s a developing country. There’s lots of corruption and there’s lots of graft.  The street cops make about $10 a day, so there’s no incentive for them to write you a ticket and send you to the normal channels.  You just give them some money and you can go on your way.
 
So living here can be a challenge of adjusting, mostly to a different way of thinking. People don’t eat until 10 o’clock at night. They nap every afternoon. The stores are open from 10 o’clock in the morning to 1 PM.  They close until 4 in the afternoon and then they open until 8.  This is true even with doctors, dentists, and hospitals. Everybody has that sort of strange schedule; there’s no “8 to 5.” So that’s difficult to deal with. Just that having to learn the new system on how things are done can be tough, because it’s very frustrating, especially if you’ve lived a lifetime in the US.
 
The other part is, even when my children were small, I had never lived in a place where I had such a sense of community. When you run into another expat, it’s like you’re friends instantly. It’s a very, very different life to live in a foreign country and have most of the people that you communicate with day in and day out to also be foreigners. The expats are like magnets to each other. I can actually be driving or walking down the street and look down the way and cross the street, and I can tell you whether the other person is a gringo or a Mexican, even if I can only see the back of him.  Expats walk differently. It’s kind of eerie.
 
That sense of community is what keeps me here. Of course, on a personal note, my artwork keeps me here. I sell a lot of art and it is what I love doing. And thank goodness, because I don’t know what I’d do all day. So I like that about living in Mexico. I don’t like the long distances to get of here. Mazatlan is best spot, beach wise. I would not belong in Puerto Vallarta or Acapulco or Playa Del Carmen. More people would speak English but it’s a little too flashy for me
 
It’s typical to fly in and out in Mexico. You can fly to Puerto Vallarta, Playa Del Carmen, Cancun, etc. via cheap round trip tickets. Getting in and out of Mazatlan is pricey and not so easy, so that can be frustrating.
 
Here in Mazatlan, Mexico, I can afford to have a handyman. My husband is not here anymore so I have this kid who comes several days a week and it doesn’t cost me hardly anything.  The downside of that is, because of that, I have to do extra to look out for his family. How can I not? If they’re hungry, I’m going to get them some food. I don’t want the three little kids to go hungry.
 
Sometimes it can be difficult to deal with the poverty, and there is real poverty. Rarely a day goes by that I don’t have a beggar at my door. This is partly because I live in a single-family dwelling and it’s easy to walk up and ring my doorbell. Probably at a high-rise condo, that just doesn’t happen. So you do find yourself having to help people with their medicine.  I just had to give my handyman 2,000 pesos (US $121.20) the other day extra because his kids got dengue. And he was really sick, so he had to go to the hospital. What are you going to do? I can’t let the kid die. I’ve never experienced that in the US, unless it was my own family. And certainly in the US, I wouldn’t have a beggar at my door. It might be on the street corner but they’re not going to be knocking on my door.
 
I would recommend living here.  Overall, you can live here cheaper, and you can get pretty decent medical care. If it gets to be a serious problem, you probably want to go home, especially if you’re on Medicare. I pay for most of my medicine out of pocket.
 
I don’t want to go back to the US. Sometimes it’s frustrating as it can be. I’d rather go visit a couple of times a year and take my car and come back with my art supplies and some groceries that I like having, but stay here in Mazatlan. Here in Mazatlan, I have a nice little house. I’ve got about $125, 000 invested in it. It’s a perfect space for me. Sometimes it’s really the distance to the US that probably I would have to tell you is my most daunting issue.
 
(Cliff diving in Mazatlan, Mexico, pictured.)

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